Saturday, 8 August 2015

10 Most Haunted Places in the World

Although our specialty here at Haunted Rooms is the UK and Ireland’s most haunted places, we’re fascinated by any haunted place, and there are definitely lots of them about. So, we have decided to put together what we think are the most haunted places in the world.

Below you’ll find a list of 10 of the most haunted locations from across the globe, some of which you will most likely of heard of, and some of which you may have not. What is for sure though, is that you’ll likely want to read some of these stories with the lights on!

10. Berry Pomeroy Castle, Totness

Berry Pomeroy Castle, a Tudor mansion within the walls of an earlier castle, is near the village of Berry Pomeroy, in South Devon, England. It was built in the late 15th century by the Pomeroy family which had held the land since the 11th century. By 1547 the family was in financial difficulties and sold the lands to Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset. Apart from a short period of forfeit to the Crown after Edward's execution, the castle has remained in the Seymour family ever since, although it was abandoned in the late 17th century when the fourth baronet moved to Wiltshire.

After lying in ruins for a hundred years, in the 19th century the castle became celebrated as an example of the "picturesque", and it became a popular tourist attraction, a status which it retains today—aided by its reputation of being haunted. Between 1980 and 1996 the castle was subjected to extensive archaeological excavations that clarified much of its history and overturned previously held beliefs regarding its age and cause of destruction.

9. Dominican Hill, Baguio City, Philippines.

When it was still accessible and opened to the public, Dominican Hill was usually the next stop for visitors who go to the Lourdes Grotto since it was just nearby. The hill was well visited not only by local and foreign tourists but also by the residents of Baguio because of the panoramic view it provided of the city. The view from the hill is without doubt breathtaking and about the best there is to see and experience.

From atop the hill you can see the whole of City Camp all the way to Burnham Park and the Baguio Cathedral. Towards the left one could see Quezon Hill, Camp Allen, the Baguio Public Market, Center Mall, the campus of Saint Louis University, and Quirino Hill. The Marcos Highway, Green Valley Country Club, and the Sto. Tomas mountain are also visible from Dominican Hill. At night when there are no clouds in the sky, it is a sight to behold to see the glow of the city lights blending beautifully with the twinkling stars in the heavens. The best time to visit the hill and to take photographs is between mid-afternoon and just about an hour before sunset when the sun is still shinning brightly on the city.

The Dominican Order in the Philippines decided in May 1911 to construct a vacation house on top of what was later called the Dominican Hill. It was a 17-hectare property the Dominicans acquired from the previous American owners. Construction work was believed to have started in 1913 under Fr. Roque Ruano and the building was inaugurated about two years later on May 23, 1915. To take advantage of tax exemptions, a school called Collegio del Santissimo Rosario was opened in June 1915 but due to the very small enrollment, the school closed two years later and the building was reverted back to the original plan of setting up a vacation house.

8. Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, Scotland

Edinburgh Castle is a historic fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland from its position on the Castle Rock. Archaeologists have established human occupation of the rock since at least the Iron Age (2nd century AD), although the nature of the early settlement is unclear. There has been a royal castle on the rock since at least the reign of David I in the 12th century, and the site continued to be a royal residence until the Union of the Crowns in 1603. From the 15th century the castle's residential role declined, and by the 17th century it was principally used as military barracks with a large garrison. Its importance as a part of Scotland's national heritage was recognised increasingly from the early 19th century onwards, and various restoration programmes have been carried out over the past century and a half. As one of the most important strongholds in the Kingdom of Scotland, Edinburgh Castle was involved in many historical conflicts from the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century to the Jacobite Rising of 1745. Research undertaken in 2014 identified 26 sieges in its 1100 year-old history, giving it a claim to having been "the most besieged place in Great Britain and one of the most attacked in the world".

Few of the present buildings pre-date the Lang Siege of the 16th century, when the medieval defences were largely destroyed by artillery bombardment. The most notable exceptions are St Margaret's Chapel from the early 12th century, which is regarded as the oldest building in Edinburgh, the Royal Palace and the early-16th-century Great Hall, although the interiors have been much altered from the mid-Victorian period onwards. The castle also houses the Scottish regalia, known as the Honours of Scotland and is the site of the Scottish National War Memorial and the National War Museum of Scotland. The British Army is still responsible for some parts of the castle, although its presence is now largely ceremonial and administrative. Some of the castle buildings house regimental museums which contribute to its presentation as a tourist attraction

7. Monte Cristo, New South Wales, Australia

The original owner, Christopher William Crawley [b1841-1910], acquired two parcels of land in Junee on conditional purchase, one of 400 acres, another 120 acres in January 1876 under provisions of the Robertson Act of 1861 . After years of struggle, farming and the many privations of regional life in a primitive slab hut, his fortunes changed when the Great Southern Railway Line opened in 1878. Perhaps tipped off the year before, he acquired a license and built the Railway Hotel opposite the soon to be bustling railway station. At that time the village consisted of Mr. Crawley's hotel, the adjoining Railway Store run by George Dobbyns, and a few scattered slab houses and bark huts. The township benefited tremendously from the influx of travelers and agricultural trade, fueling the regions explosive growth.
Monte Christo Homestead is a historic Australian property located in the town of Junee, New South Wales. Constructed by local pioneer Christopher William Crawley in 1885, it is a double-story late-Victorian manor standing on a hill overlooking the town.

The Crawley family remained in residence until 1948. The house then stood empty under the care of several caretakers until 1963 when it was purchased by Reg and Olive Ryan, who restored it to its current condition. It operates as a museum, antique store and tourist attraction, advertising itself as "Australia's most haunted house".
Monte Cristo has been featured in television shows such as Big Country in 1977, the travel show Getaway in 1992, the paranormal based game/reality show Scream Test in 2000, and Ghost Hunters International 14 January 2010.

6. Ancient Ram Inn, Gloucestershire, England

The Ancient Ram Inn is a Grade II* listed building and a former pub located in Wotton-under-Edge, a market town within the Stroud district of Gloucestershire, England. It is said to be one of the most haunted hotels in the country. The inn has been owned by many people since 1145 and is currently in private ownership. This inn was said to have also been owned by the local St. Mary's Church when first built.

The Ancient Ram Inn has been investigated by many paranormal researchers, particularly for television shows like Ghost Adventures and Most Haunted. The inn was featured on Great British Ghosts and was also investigated by UK Paranormal Study group led by Kieron Butler which consisted of seven people, including photographers and medium/spiritual advisors. The Ghost Club (the oldest paranormal research organization in the world) investigated the inn in 2003 but didn't register anything paranormal. The Danish paranormal research team DPA (Dansk Parapsykologisk Aspekt) has also been there with a TV crew, shooting an episode for a Danish ghost-hunter TV show.

5. Highgate Cemetery, North London, England

Highgate Cemetery is a place of burial in north London, England. It is designated Grade I on the Historic England Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England. It is divided into two parts, named the East and West cemetery. There are approximately 170,000 people buried in around 53,000 graves at Highgate Cemetery. Highgate Cemetery is notable both for some of the people buried there as well as for its de facto status as a nature reserve.

The cemetery is located on both sides of Swain's Lane in Highgate, N6, next to Waterlow Park. The main gate is located just north of Oakshott Avenue. There is another disused gate on Chester Road. The cemetery is in the London Boroughs of Camden, Haringey and Islington. The nearest transport link is Archway tube station.

The cemetery in its original form – the northwestern wooded area – opened in 1839, as part of a plan to provide seven large, modern cemeteries, known as the "Magnificent Seven", around the outside of central London. The inner-city cemeteries, mostly the graveyards attached to individual churches, had long been unable to cope with the number of burials and were seen as a hazard to health and an undignified way to treat the dead. The initial design was by architect and entrepreneur Stephen Geary.

On Monday 20 May 1839, Highgate Cemetery was dedicated to St. James by the Right Reverend Charles Blomfield, Lord Bishop of London. Fifteen acres were consecrated for the use of the Church of England, and two acres set aside for Dissenters. Rights of burial were sold for either limited period or in perpetuity. The first burial was Elizabeth Jackson of Little Windmill Street, Soho, on 26 May.

4. Bhangarh Fort, India

The Bhangarh Fort is a 17th-century fort built in Rajasthan, India. A new village of Bhangarh with a population of 1,306 in 200 households has developed outside the limits of the fort as there is fear of ghosts haunting the old city. The fort and its precincts are well preserved.

Although it is a 300-km drive away from Delhi, yet a handful of people know about it. We started driving towards Bhangarh from Delhi early morning, expecting the journey to last not more than four hours. As not many people frequent the place, we did not have any first hand information and took guidance from a map and distance measurements available on the internet.
After crossing Gurgaon we proceeded towards Bhiwadi and turned to Alwar district in Rajasthan. Till this point we did not encounter any problem; it was a nice long drive and a little anxiety about what we would encounter at the fort.
From Alwar, as we crossed the Sariska reserve, the weather conditions changed. The sky became completely dark and in the afternoon it seemed like 7 o' clock in the evening. Dark clouds started descending over the Aravalli range and both melted into each other.

3. Screaming Tunnel, Niagara Falls, Ontario

The Screaming Tunnel is a small limestone tunnel, running underneath what once was the Grand Trunk Railway lines (now the Canadian National Railways), located in the northwest corner of Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. The actual location of the attraction is just off Warner Road. Often thought to be a railway tunnel, it was actually constructed only as a drainage tunnel so that water can be removed from the farmlands. This water would go underneath the Grand Trunk Railway and down to the valley below. Farmers used this tunnel to transport goods and animals safely underneath the busy railroad above.

The tunnel, constructed in the early 1900s, is 16 feet (4.9 m) in height and 125 feet (38 m) long.

A local legend recounts that the tunnel is haunted by the ghost of a young girl, who after escaping a nearby burning farm building with her clothing ablaze, died within its walls. Several variants of the legend exist locally, one version has the girl set on fire by her enraged father after he loses custody of his children after a nasty divorce. Another tells of a young girl being raped inside the tunnel and her body burned to prevent any evidence from being found.  All variants involve a claim that a match struck within the tunnel's recesses will produce the sound of the young girl's dying screams, this purported phenomenon is alleged to be the origin of the tunnel's name.

The tunnel was used as a set during the filming of David Cronenberg's 1983 film adaptation of Stephen King's horror novel The Dead Zone.

An independent film, titled Limestone Burning, used the legend as a basis for the plot, and was filmed at the tunnel and in surrounding Niagara Falls, Ontario and Buffalo, New York, locations. Production was completed in the late summer of 2012.

2. Ohio University,  Athens, America

Ohio University is a major U.S. public research university located primarily on a 1,850-acre (7.5 km2) campus in Athens, Ohio, United States. As one of America's oldest universities, Ohio University was chartered on February 18, 1804, and opened for students in 1809. As of 2014, the Athens campus had approximately 23,300 individual students; the other five campuses had approximately 10,000 combined; and eLearning had approximately 5900 individual students. In total, 39,201 individuals were enrolled in classes equivalent to 30,878 full time equivalent attendance.

The university maintains a selective admission rate with further admission requirements for its schools. The Heritage College of Medicine maintains its separate select admissions criteria. Ohio University offers more than 250 areas of undergraduate study. On the graduate level, the university grants master’s degrees in many of its major academic divisions, and doctoral degrees in selected departments. Ohio University is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classifies Ohio as a Research University (high research activity) under the Basic Classification category.

1. Changi Beach, Singapore

Changi Beach is popular among locals as a hangout for overnight family picnics, especially on weekends. Some individuals enjoy fishing, watching landing airplanes, jogging and watching the sunrise or sunset here. Sunrise can be viewed from the SAF Changi Ferry Terminal on the eastern end of the park and sunsets can be viewed from Changi Point. Barbecue parties, camping and water sports are some common activities. In addition, food lovers visit Changi Beach for seafood at the nearby Bistro@Changi, or for different food options at Changi Village.

Changi Beach served as a killing ground for the Japanese during the Sook Ching massacre of The Second World War. Thousands of Chinese were tortured and killed during this Operation as they were suspected of being anti-Japanese. Strange crying and screaming are reported by people.

Since May 2009, the National Biodiversity Centre, together with volunteers from National Parks Board and nature groups such as Wild Singapore and TeamSeaGrass, initiated a project to monitor identified populations of Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) and Pipefish (Syngnathoides biaculeatus) in several locations including Changi Beach for conservation management purposes. The data gathered will help to estimate the population size, growth rate of individuals and track their movements in their natural habitats.

these was the most Haunted places around the world, share your thinking in the comments

Tags: haunt places, haunted houses, haunt the house, a haunted house, haunting, haunt, haunted places in india, list of horror films, horror movies list, Top horror, 10 most haunted places.

No comments:

Post a Comment